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Placing You On the Path of Enlightenment

A Word About Us

Joining a church can mean many things to many people. Some seek out God and community when they feel they have lost their way, or are seeking a deeper purpose, or are looking for a way to connect to their family and cultural identity. But it is our belief that the Church, at its core, is about finding love and beauty through God and God’s work.
Joining a church can mean many things to many people. Some seek out God and community when they feel they have lost their way, or are seeking a deeper purpose, or are looking for a way to connect to their family and cultural identity. But it is our believe that the Church, at its core, is about finding love and beauty through God and God’s work.

At Lawtonville Baptist Church, we inspire individuals of all ages and backgrounds to bring the Lord Almighty into their lives at every moment - moments of joy, moments of despair, and even those moments in between. We are committed to the teachings of Jesus Christ, and are here to spread His message with loving patience and kindness. Contact us

Our History

The Lawtonville Baptist Church, built in 1911, is significant for its stunning and largely intact Late Gothic Revival architecture that is attributed to the regionally significant Savannah architect Julian DeBruyn Kops. Employing a degree of complexity and sensitivity that seems unique not only to churches in Hampton County of the period but also to southern Baptist churches in general, Kops managed to create a house of worship that functioned as an elaborate symbol of Judeo-Christian iconography, beginning with his complex, Star of Redemption pavilion roof, then continuing with the Star of David symbols on the two main approaches to its entrance corner, and culminating in the Alpha and Omega designs that greet church members every time they enter the sanctuary and the portico arch gates whose motif clearly intended to evoke the Trinity. Rare indeed is the religious architecture of this church in a small, rural, southern town that emphasized such an intricate and weighty connection to the imagery and iconography of early Christianity. The church is a brick building with a complex, asphalt-shingle, pavilion roof with projecting gables, dominant stained glass windows, and an intriguing back entrance that resembles a castle keep. In 1945, the congregation added a Sunday School building to the east of the original church building, as well as a music building addition to the east of that in 1962. Neither building addition is contributing. In 1973, the church completed a remarkably sensitive renovation that closed in the existing sanctuary entrance to create a rounded front and a rain shelter for arriving and departing congregation members, while also preserving the original appearance of this portion of the façade inside the new addition. Listed in the National Register October 9, 2012.

This information was obtained from the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. 

http://www.nationalregister.sc.gov/hampton/S10817725013/index.htm

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